Robert J. Sawyer

Hugo and Nebula Award-Winning Science Fiction Writer

Archive for the 'Nonfiction' Category

My Star Trek computer-graphics article — 30 years later

Monday, June 30th, 2014

Thirty years ago today, on June 30, 1984, when I was 24, the following article by me appeared in The Toronto Star, Canada’s largest-circulation newspaper. As a young freelance writer just beginning my career, selling to The Star was a huge accomplishment (although this was actually my second piece for them). The article came about [...]

30th anniversary of my involvement with Vision TV

Saturday, October 12th, 2013

After my keynote address at Science Fiction: The Interdisciplinary Genre, the academic conference held in my honour in September 2013 at McMaster University, I was asked by an audience member about where my interest in, and sympathetic treatment of, religion — which is clearly evident in many of my works, including Calculating God and Hominids [...]

The Purpose of Science Fiction

Sunday, June 26th, 2011

The Purpose of Science Fiction by Robert J. Sawyer First published in Slate 27 January 2011 Forget Star Wars, Lost in Space, and all the other escapist fare you think of when you hear the term “science fiction.” Print science fiction is an important tool for dealing with real-life issues related to new technology — [...]

My article in Slate

Thursday, January 27th, 2011

See my article “The Purpose of Science Fiction” in Slate. Robert J. Sawyer online:Website • Facebook • Twitter • Newsgroup • Email

Science: Ten Lost Years

Monday, July 5th, 2010

An op-ed piece by Robert J. Sawyer first published in The Ottawa Citizen, the largest-circulation newspaper in Canada’s capital city (first published under the headline “The Future Disappoints”). Science: Ten Lost Years by Robert J. Sawyer Ten years ago, in 1999, I published a novel called FlashForward; ten years later, it’s a (cough, cough) hit [...]

Op-ed piece in today’s Ottawa Citizen: Science decade in review

Wednesday, December 9th, 2009

Today’s (Wednesday, December 9, 2009) Ottawa Citizen — the largest-circulation newspaper in Canada’s capital city — contains a commissioned op-ed piece by Robert J. Sawyer entitled “The Future Disappoints,” looking back at the progress in science and technology over the last decade. This is the first of a series of decade-in-review op-eds that will be [...]

Sawyer addresses Canadian Science Writers’ Association

Saturday, May 30th, 2009

On Monday, May 25, 2009, Robert J. Sawyer gave the closing keynote address at the annual meeting of the Canadian Science Writers’ Association (Canada’s professional organization of science journalists), which this year was held in Sudbury, Ontario. Rob’s 52-minute talk to the CSWA (including Q&A session) is now available right here. (Matthew Dalzell of the [...]

All Screens Are Not Created Equal

Monday, May 4th, 2009

My op-ed piece “All Screens Are Not Created Equal” — about computer use, multitasking, and attention deficit — is now on my website here. It was first published in The Ottawa Citizen, the largest circulation newspaper in Canada’s capital city, on March 20, 2009. The Robert J. Sawyer Web Site

Nina Munteanu on my op-ed

Thursday, April 9th, 2009

On March 20, 2009, I had an op-ed piece in The Ottawa Citizen about the use of computers by children. Nina Munteanu — always a fascinating blogger, as well as a very fine SF writer — responds with some very interesting ruminations here. The Robert J. Sawyer Web Site

RJS op-ed in today’s Ottawa Citizen

Friday, March 20th, 2009

The Friday, March 20, 2009, edition of the Ottawa Citizen — the largest circulation newspaper in Canada’s capital city — has an op-ed piece by me entitled “All Screens Are Not Created Equal” about multitasking, computer use, and attention deficit disorder. At some point it will go behind the subscribers-only wall, but right now it’s [...]

Michael Crichton: Stranger than Truth

Monday, January 15th, 2007

I have an op-ed piece on Michael Crichton’s tendency to bend the truth in his fiction in today’s Ottawa Citizen, the largest circulation newspaper in Canada’s capital city. You can read it online here. (An op-ed piece is an article that appears opposite the Editorial — that is, on the facing page; it’s an opinion [...]